Archive for the ‘FearBush.com’ Category

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I miss Fearbush.com

October 3, 2007

Damn it, who else am I supposed to argue with and waste company time on?

Chen, is there any way to buy it from Jerry and get it back up? I’d be willing to throw down on it, but I’m not technical enough to run it. What do you think? You up for it? Is it even possible.

 grumble grumble grumble….

 Sliq

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FearBush.com Is Down (again), And An Idea

September 11, 2007

It has come to my attention that one of my favorite sites, FearBush.com, is offline.  I admit that I haven’t been posting there as much as I used to because I’ve spent the majority of my online time working in the realm of the blogosphere. Also, because of my new job, I seem to have less time for this kind of thing in general.

I’ve sent out an email to a dozen FB regulars that I had in my address book to see if they are interested in using my blog as a hangout during the downtime.  If this situation is permanent, I’ve considered the idea of turning the Chamber into a “group” blog (a blog that has several authors).  Group blogs are quite popular, actually.  Most ordinary people have regular jobs, after all, and it’s tough to find the time to run a blog all by yourself and expect the site to be entertaining enough to keep regular readers and commentors.  And let’s face it, there are literally millions of blogs out there, so many of the people that post comments here are “drive bys”.

Most group blogs that are political in nature feature authors who are like-minded individuals and focused on a specific theme (for example, an anti-Hillary blog, or a pro-Brownback blog, or pro-life, etc.).  I’ve long considered something different, however.  My idea would be to open up my blog to authors (who I trust) that are unlike-minded.  The ideal would be a blog that features posts from a diverse range of viewpoints, and topics are debated in the comments sections in a relatively civil manner.  Incidentally, this is sort of the reason that I started the WordPress Political Blogger Alliance and why my blogroll features blogs from all over the political spectrum.  In fact, the reason why I named the blog the “Chamber” was because I had hoped that there would be a certain amount of honorable battling going on here.

I have already granted authorship to several individuals a few months back, but I thought I’d try to expand on it a bit.  I think it would be fun, for example, to feature an author who as a regular on LGF, and another that is a regular on Kos (two blogs that consistently go at each other).  Perhaps I’d feature an author who is part of the 9/11 truth movement, another who is a conservative Christian, another who is Muslim.  I could have someone from Canada, and another from Europe.  The idea would be to make the blog a kind of playground of ideas. 

There are, of course, many political message boards out there that feature an open exchange of ideas.  For blogs, however, I think this sort of diverse group dynamic would be fairly unique.  And blogs have an advantage over message boards, in that they are tapped into the arena of political discourse in the blogosphere. 

Anyway, I thought it would be a cool idea, and since I’ve met many diverse netizens in my travels thus far, I already have a mental list of a few people who I’d like to have on.  I would try to keep the number of authors fairly limited, while having enough to make sure that the site maintained a certain amount of balance.  I think it would result in a pretty entertaining site, and at the same time it might -in some small way- bridge some of the divisions and increase understanding while promoting intellectual honesty and attacking ‘group think’. 

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My Use Of The N-Word

July 5, 2007

About a month ago, I received this response to one of my comments on LGF:

#30 DesertSage  6/03/2007 11:03:23 pm PDT 

…but because they figure he isn’t one of the neocons.

“neocon” is Lefty code-speak for “Jews”.

ChenZhen uses the term “neocon” as a pejorative.
ChenZhen is an anti-semite, I new there was a reason I disliked him.
Babbazee is right!

If there’s one thing I really can’t stand is an anti-semitic Leftist.
The thing I like even less is an anti-semitic Leftist that denies that he’s an anti-semite…so don’t even try it ChenZhen!

Then, last night, I spotted this comment on another WP blog:

25. Mark – July 4, 2007
…Gabe, Neo-Con is a racist slur. No shock that you use it…

 

Am I missing something here? Isn’t ‘neocon’ just short for ‘neoconservative‘? It’s just political ideology, right?

Intrigued, I did some searching, and I stumbled upon some old opinion pieces:

Blame It on Neo -Don’t call me a “neocon” unless you are a friend.

One big culprit has been Air America. Tune in to the proudly liberal radio network, and you’ll hear actress-turned-activist Janeane Garofalo and other hosts frequently blast the “influence” of the “neocons” on the Bush Administration, then go on to name names such as Wolfowitz, Perle, Abrams and Libby. Not a single gentile name makes the list, so it’s the Jewish influence to which the network takes particular exception.

‘Neocon’: Slang for ‘Jew’?

After laying the groundwork of neocons as superhawks, the Business Week piece informs readers that the key members of the movement who advise President Bush are “Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz, Pentagon policy chief Douglas J. Feith and Defense Policy Board member Richard N. Perle.” Fair enough. All three have, at various times, been labeled neocons. But then, Mr. Dunham draws an interesting distinction. He describes Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and Vice President Dick Cheney as “key allies,” but not as “neocons.” In the remainder of the article, former Reagan administration official Ken Adelman and Weekly Standard editor William Kristol are identified as other “neocons.”

I have to apologise.  I had no idea that when I called Francis Fukuyama a ‘neocon’ in this post a year ago I was actually using code to label him a Jew.

fukucross.jpg

I’m hoping some of my fellow bloggers could help me out here. What would be more politically correct? Should I just spell out ‘neoconservative’? Or should I adopt some sort of family-friendly way to post the word, like n**cons?

Edit- That was sarcasm, BTW.

One final note.  I see all this as grievance theater.  Accusations of anti-Semitism seem to get fired at people on a hair trigger all the time, and I think this is a perfect example. 

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My July 4th Sentiment

July 4, 2007

I have a confession.  I was pretty close to celebrating the 4th of July on my blog by posting a nice video of flags waving or fireworks bursting and the national anthem blaring.  I must have searched YouTube for a half an hour looking for the perfect vid.  However, as I sat there watching these videos I couldn’t help but to think that the whole idea just didn’t seem sincere. 

Call me unpatriotic if you want, but displaying such a video while our country is being led by a dangerous administration and an equally broken Congress wasn’t going to encapsulate my attitude this day.  I’m sure I’m not alone in thinking that ‘taps’ would be the tune that jumps ahead in one’s mind, actually.  So, I’ve decided to post a different video.

As I mentioned a couple of posts down, I did a lot of blogging on the FearBush.com site before starting the blog here (I’m still a regular in the forums).  I thought of it as kind of a privilege, since it was one of the few sites out there whose founders were prophetic enough to have actually predicted the Bush disaster back in early 2000.  In fact, the url was originally intended as a warning (as you might have guessed).  Since then, many others have joined on the anti-Bush bandwagon, and I suppose by now I feel a sense of vindication for having felt passionately about this for so long. 

Of all the anti-administration rants I posted over there over the last couple of years, I never posted any of the Keith Olbermann “Special Comments”, since I preferred to give my own perspective.  Today, however, I’m gonna give Keith a post on this blog, because tonight’s edition was one heck of a doozy.  On this 4th of July, we should all consider what’s being said here and what it really means to be patriotic.


(video hat tip: Suzie Q)

Enjoy the fireworks.

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For The Record, Bush Said He Regretted “Bring ‘Em On”

July 2, 2007

I noticed that there were a few blogs talking about the fourth anniversary of Bush’s famous “Bring ’em on” line, and I thought I’d just post a little reminder for my fellow bloggers.  Bush did say this last year:

“Saying `bring it on,’ kind of tough talk, you know, that sent the wrong signal to people,” the president said in answer to a question about mistakes he made in Iraq. “I learned some lessons about expressing myself maybe in a little more sophisticated manner — you know, `wanted dead or alive,’ that kind of talk.”

Now, as readers who are familiar with my posts know, I’m about as far from a Bush apologist as one can get.  In fact, before I started this blog, I did all my blogging on FearBush.com (sorry I haven’t updated in a while, but I think most of America ‘gets it’ by now).  When I saw this story, I did in fact give him credit on that site for saying this.  I remember this because it’s probably the only time I’d ever seen Bush express regret….for anything.

So, I’m posting this now in light of the posts out there who are beating him up over this without giving full disclosure.  I have stated on here before that I wish bloggers would be more intellectually honest, and that goes for both right and left as far as I’m concerned.  I know he can’t undo the damage that reckless remark has probably done, but I think that perhaps there are other things that my fellow administration critics can focus on at this point.

So, just for the record, here is the original “Bring ’em on” comment:

And here is Bush saying that he regretted that comment:

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When Satire Becomes Reality

June 6, 2007

Flashback to January 2001.  The Onion posts one of their “satirical” articles about the future of the Bush presidency, which included (among many other statements that turned out to be prophetic) a faux reaction from Rush Limbaugh to the newly-elected president:

“For years, I tirelessly preached the message that Clinton must be stopped,” conservative talk-radio host Rush Limbaugh said. “And yet, in 1996, the American public failed to heed my urgent warnings, re-electing Clinton despite the fact that the nation was prosperous and at peace under his regime. But now, thank God, that’s all done with. Once again, we will enjoy mounting debt, jingoism, nuclear paranoia, mass deficit, and a massive military build-up.”

Read the whole thing (it’s pretty good):  Bush: ‘Our Long National Nightmare Of Peace And Prosperity Is Finally Over’ (hat tip: ThunderDawg)

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Judith A. Klinghoffer’s Bizarre View On ‘Winning The War On Terror’

April 26, 2007

As the blogs react to a recent opinion poll that came out regarding terrorism and the Muslim world, one column by Judith A. Klinghoffer caught my attention:  Poll: US unpopular but winning War on Terror

Now, anyone who’s read a bit of my blog will probably be thinking that my head exploded just reading the title (you’re not far off), but I thought I’d comment on it.  I’ll skip the long analysis of what was prefaced as a ‘push poll’, and move right to the conclusion:

All in all, the glass is 3/4 full. Yes, theoretically, Muslims would like to see a day when they will all unite within the border of a righteous Khalifat but they disagree with Al Qaeda and Bin Laden means and unwilling to pay the high price needed to achieve it. The As it was the American led War on Terror which raised that price, it is a small wonder America is not popular in the Muslim world. I am sure the US was not popular in Germany during W.W.II. or in the USSR during the Cold war. Trying to be popular with the enemy is a strange idea anyhow. Actually, as we have learned with victory comes even a very short lived boost of popularity. All in all, PIPA push poll contains encouraging news.

Stumbling through the grammatical errors in that, and ignoring the fact that Judith slipped in her opinion that the ‘Muslim world’ is the ‘enemy’ (and validating our unpopularity in the process), it’s clear that I’ve come across a rare brand of Kool-Aid here.  

On one hand, we have the quest for ‘victory’ in the ‘War on Terror’.  A war which, by definition, can only be ‘won’ the day that people stop wanting to blow us up. On the other hand, we have a poll showing our rampant unpopularity and sympathy to al Qaeda across 4 Mid East nations .  The verdict: ‘encouraging news’.  Even if it is a push poll, I don’t know how anyone can view this as a positive step towards victory in a war that is unwinnable to begin with anyway.  In fact, I think I would have learned more if she would have just taken the poll herself and posted her answers.

Something tells me that this all comes back to Bush and Iraq.  The war has worsened our post 9/11 position.  The war supporters don’t want to admit that us ‘BDS’ sufferers were right all along, so they whitewash news like this by screaming ‘push poll’.  It’s the same type of thing when people say that the ISG doesn’t know what the hell they’re talking about (as if they do either), or try to spin the NIE’s assessments.  No one wants to admit that they supported what turned out to be an unmitigated disaster.

So, just for the record, this has been the most popular forum on FearBush.com, and has run like this since 2002:

World War III
September 11th was undoubtedly one of the most tragic days in American history. It’s unconscionable that Bush has used those who lost lives on that day as justification for an endless campaign of fear, misinformation and hate. Bush’s sudden need to wage war on Iraq will only breed more world hatred for the US, inspire more terrorism, at a cost of even more untold civilian lives. War should always be a LAST RESORT, not a matter of policy.

Registration is open.

Update:  More ‘encouraging news’ : Annual terrorism report will show 29% rise in attacks

WASHINGTON – A State Department report on terrorism due out next week will show a nearly 30 percent increase in terrorist attacks worldwide in 2006 to more than 14,000, almost all of the boost due to growing violence in Iraq and Afghanistan, U.S. officials said Friday.